CGS40 - Modulo Magic

A CV and signal processor based on the mathematical modulo principle.


This is a PCB only suitable for multiple formats


Availability: In stock

$21.99

Details

Details

In the mathematical world, modulo gives the remainder after an integer division. For example 7 divided by 4 would give a result of 1, with 3 remainder, so 7 modulo 4 would be 3. 11 modulo 4 would also be 3, as would 15 modulo 4 and so on.

This module allows a similar principle to be applied to a voltage. If the modulo (Step Initiation CV) is set at 1 volt and the step size also set at 1V, the output would follow the input while the input remained between 0V and 1V. As soon as 1V was reached, 1 volt would be subtracted from the output, so for an input varying between 1V and 2V, the output would track at a volt less, i.e. between 0V and 1V again. There are 8 stages to the module, so this process would occur again as the input voltage passed 2 volts and so on up to 8 volts. Of course, the Step Initiation CV and Step size are adjustable.

This can be used to constrain a CV to a single octave or similar interval as needed.

Now consider if the step size is greater than the Step Initiation CV (SICV) - each time a multiple of the SICV is passed, the greater step size voltage will be subtracted, resulting in successive negative offsets to the output. A smaller step size will have the opposite effect, with successive positive offsets being added. When a rising voltage is fed via this particular setup to a VCO, rising "bubbles" will result.

There is also an offset adjustment to adjust the initial value to which the modulo will be applied. An optional switch will allow the number of modulo cycles to be limited between 8 and 1.

Of course that is not the only way this module can be used. It can also be used as an audio frequency wave multiplier. A triangle, sine or sawtooth waveform at audio frequencies can be modified to produce some pleasant reedy type sounds. As the inputs can be controlled by CVs, these timbres can of course be swept.

A little on how it works:

 

 
The schematic of the Modulo Magic.

 

 

IC3 is forms a mixer with both inverted and non-inverted inputs for the control of the size of the step (Step Size) that is added to or subtracted from the CV being processed. Of note is that the output is inverted so as to work with the remainder of the circuitry, which is designed to work with an inverted signal to keep the parts count down. Keep this in mind when studying the diagram.

A mixer output is provided so this section of the module can be used as a plain CV mixer when not being used for other processing. When used as a mixer, if a non-inverted output is required, the signal must be fed into the 'subtract' inputs.

IC1 is a straight forward, two (inverting) stage, non-inverting DC summer/buffer with unity gain. The CV to be processed is fed into this buffer, and the modified signal is taken from its output. All processing is done to the voltage between these two inverting stages.

The output of the first inverting stage of IC1 (pin 1) is fed the sense inputs of a row of comparators (IC4-7). This voltage is compared with a series of reference voltages created by a string of resistors being driven by the first op-amp of IC2. The voltage present at the input of this stage (the Step Initiation CV) is divided into equal portions by the resistor string, to provide the equally spaced modulo points. The actual number of points is determined by a rotary switch that grounds the string part way though by connecting one of the "T" points to 0 volts. If none of the points are grounded, there are 8 modulo points.

As the CV being fed into IC1 increases, each comparator is triggered as its sense point is passed. The output of each comparator in turn switches on an analog switch, routing the output of step size mixer to the second stage summer of the CV processing buffer. This voltage will be summed with the input CV before being passed to the output. Each of these comparators controls an identical stage, so each time another is triggered, the exact same voltage is summed with the input CV, producing another "step". The size and direction of this step depends on the output of the Step Size mixer. If it is equal to the Step Initiation CV, the result will be true modulo, otherwise it will be one of the other effects described above.

An offset voltage can be added to the point where the first step occurs, using the second op-amp of IC2, an inverting buffer. Its outputs are fed simultaneously to both stages of the CV buffer (IC1) - thus canceling out any overall voltage offset at the output. This offset however is present at pin 1 of IC1 - the output of the first stage, and thus also present at the sense inputs of all of the comparators. This offset effectively shifts all sensing points by exactly the same amount, allowing a wider or narrower point before the first step occurs.

How does a device (the 4066) that has only a 15v range allow at least +/-10V to pass through it? The answer is it doesn't. By powering the 4066 and its associated drive circuitry from +14.4V and -0.6V, and placing the output of the analog switch at the virtual ground point of an inverting op-amp buffer, the full range of the signal is allowed to pass while the voltage at that point is held near or at 0V by the action of the op-amp while the analog switch is closed. When the analog switch is open, the diode connected between the input and 0V prevents in incoming signal from going below -0.6V, and thus prevents it from going outside the allowed input range. There is no need to protect against excursions in the positive direction, as these are in the allowed input range. A second diode at the output of the analog switch prevents the op-amp from driving the output below -0.6V, should the switch open while such potential exists.

Specs & Downloads

Specs & Downloads

manufacturer CGS
HP No
Depth No
+12V No
-12V No
+5V No
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